Would you like something to read in the holidays?

The Library Staff have put together some recommendations for your holiday reading. The following titles are some of the books on display in the library for you to borrow. So if you’re planning on relaxing, perhaps sitting by the fire or spending some time on the couch these holidays …. then drop by to select your book. 

I bought Left Neglected by Lisa Genova over Easter after hearing a review on the radio and  I really enjoyed it. It is the story of a women who suffers a brain injury when she is involved in a car accident, which completely erases the left side of her world. It tells the story about her recovery and how her and her family adjust. I then discovered that the library had a copy of Still Alice which is Lisa Genova’s first novel. Again we see a professional woman and how she discovers she has early onset Alzheimer’s and how her and her family deal with this. Heartbreaking story told from Alice’s view. Both these books are fiction but are written with great insight and the author Lisa Genova who has a degree in Biopsychology and has a Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Harvard University,  brings something special to her telling of these women’s stories. I look forward to reading her third book which she is currently writing, called Love Anthony, about a boy with autism. Highly recommend both books. If you would like to read Left Neglected I am happy to lend it and Still Alice is available from the library. Reviewed by Dawn

 

The Deep End of the Ocean – Jacquelyn Mitchard

Beth has taken her 2 sons away with her for her school reunion. While she is checking into the hotel her 3 year old son vanishes. The search for Ben becomes nationwide news and his disappearance destroys Beth’s family. Nine years later the family’s lives are turned upside down again when a boy knocks on their door looking for work. Reviewed by Simone

 

 

 

 

 

The Diggers Rest Hotel: A Charlie Berlin Mystery –  Geoffrey McGeachin

In 1947, two years after witnessing the death of a young Jewish woman in Poland, Charlie Berlin has rejoined the police force a different man. Sent to investigate a spate of robberies in rural Victoria, he soon discovers that World War II has changed even the most ordinary of places and people. An ex-bomber pilot and former POW, Berlin is struggling to fit back in: grappling with post-traumatic stress disorder, the ghosts of his dead crew and his futile attempts to numb the pain. When Berlin travels to Albury-Wodonga to track down the gang behind the robberies, he suspects he’s a problem cop being set up to fail. Taking a room at the Diggers Rest Hotel in Wodonga, he sets about solving a case that no one else can – with the help of feisty, ambitious journalist Rebecca Green and rookie constable Rob Roberts, the only cop in town he can trust. Then the decapitated body of a young girl turns up in a back alley, and Berlin’s investigations lead him ever further through layers of small-town fears, secrets and despair. The first Charlie Berlin mystery takes us into a world of secret alliances and loyalties – and a society dealing with the effects of a war that changed men forever.
 

 

Devil’s Consort – Anne O’Brien

Eleanor of Aquitaine is just fifteen years old when her father dies and she marries Louis, the future king of France. They’ve not even reached Paris before the crises in Eleanor’s marriage become apparent; her husband has no interest in consummating their union, despite his physical attractiveness, is ruled by several members of his government, and has ascended to the throne without knowing anything about what he is doing. Taking us through Eleanor’s life from this moment through her journey on Crusade and second marriage, Devil’s Consort (Queen Defiant in the US) explores what might have really happened to one of history’s most well known royal women.

Here in Boyne’s eighth novel, aimed at adult readers the total brutality, filth and gore of war are aptly displayed. In that sense, despite the most beautiful use of language this is not a story for the faint hearted. The Absolutist is a tragic heart rendering story of hostilities, of opportunities lost and of a young generation losing their lives and their hope. Boyne has managed to record both the distinct lack of humanity for adolescence in war and their total incomprehension to their situation. Recommended by Claire

This is the shocking, profoundly moving and morally challenging story… It will haunt you, it will help to complete you… nothing short of miraculous.” -Augusten Burroughs “Just when you thought you might have read about every horror of the Holocaust, a book will come along and shine a fierce light upon yet another haunting wrong. Sarah’s Key is such a novel. In remarkably unsparing, unsentimental prose… through a lens so personal and intimate, it will make you cry–and remember.” -Jenna Blum, author of Those Who Save Us “A haunting, riveting novel… This book grabs your heart in the opening chapter, and its scenes and characters stay with you long after you finish.” –Publishers Weekly, a PW 2008 Staff Pick “Masterly and compelling, it is not something that readers will quickly forget. Highly recommended.”-Library Journal, Starred Review “Exceptional, emotional, and compelling…” – “Sacramento Bee” “A powerful novel… Tatiana de Rosnay has captured the insane world of the Holocaust and the efforts of the few good people who stood up against it in this work of fiction more effectively than has been done in many scholarly studies. It is a book that makes us sensitive to how much evil occurred and also to how much willingness to do good also existed in that world.” –Rabbi Jack Riemer, South Florida Jewish Journal “A remarkable novel written with eloquence and empathy.”

Recommended by Rhonda

We have this book on the staff kindle as well as the hard copy. So if you’d like to read this title and try out an ereader over the holidays, please see us about borrowing it.

 

 

Five Bells – Gail Jones

This is, quite simply, a beautiful book. To capture, in 200 pages, the lives of four disparate characters, across a single summer’s day, at Sydney’s iconic Circular Quay, and offer as rich and affecting a story of humanity as this is some achievement. Like the author, all the characters are new to Sydney: one from China, one from Ireland, and two from Jones’ own Western Australia. Theirs are separate backgrounds, but the day’s circumstances draw their narrated experiences together, and the secrets, haunting experiences and travails of their earlier lives are revealed.

Recommended by Catherine

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